Winners of 2nd Annual UT Creepy Crawly Photo Contest!!

  It’s PHOTO TIME in TENNESSEE! ‘Bug’ photos, that is! Our department hosted our second annual UT Creepy Crawly Photo Contest from October 2nd to October 21st, 2020. All submitted photos must have been taken on the UT campus in 2019 or 2020. And they were graded from 1) Best ‘Creepy Crawly’ Photo, 2) Scariest Photo, 3) Most Humorous Photo (and new this year) 4) Scariest Photoshop, and Most Humorous Photoshop. A Best of Show has yet to be determined but will also be awarded! Stay Tuned! This contest was hosted by the students in FYS 129 (“A Bug’s Life”) and the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology! We had a great turn out this year and can’t wait for the next.

Graduate Student Spotlight from the Office of Research and Engagement

Last week, the Office of Research and Engagement interviewed one of our students and featured them in the recent graduate student spotlight. Please look below for a snippet of their newsletter and be sure to click the link below for the full story!     A newsletter from the Office of Research and Engagement     Matthew Longmire grew up on his family farm in Clinton, TN, so it was no surprise that he became interested in research on agricultural systems. The fact that he can do this while incorporating another life-long fascination—bugs—is just the icing on the cake. Longmire is a graduate student in entomology and plant pathology at the UT Institute of Agriculture, and his research studies the

A young Dr. Lambdin crouching before a dugout-trench in a military base

Veterans Appreciation Week

A Veteran in Entomology & Plant Pathology Dr. Paris Lambdin has been with our department since 1974 (45 years!) and is a veteran of the Vietnam War. He was in the Marine Corps from 1967-1969 (pictured above). In January 1968, he arrived in Việt Nam, during the outbreak of The Tet Offensive and where he engaged in 5 campaigns during his 13-month deployment. This week was dedicated to him and the many others who served. Thank you for your service!

Shelly Pate holding a poster demonstrating the distribution of 100 seedlings with various different fungal pathogens

Shelly Pate: What Being First-Generation Means to Me

National First-Generation College Student Celebration Being First-Generation is beautiful and provides a unique perspective, and our department is teeming with first-generation students and faculty. To showcase this personally, we wanted to feature one of our students’ thoughts. Shelly Pate is a Graduate Research Assistant who is working on her Masters with a concentration in Plant Pathology and is currently stationed at the West TN Research & Education Center. She is also a First-Generation College Student and wanted to share her experience: As an only child, I have always received an abundant amount of love, support, and guidance. However, when the time came to start applying to colleges as an undergraduate, I realized something was starting to become a little different.