2021 Buggy Buffet Cancelled

Buggy Buffet is an annual event that involves students from UT’s First-Year Studies class “A Bug’s Life”. Over the years, this event presented a selection of menu items that feature insect-based ingredients. For example, during the annual event in 2019, some of the students truly enjoyed ants-on-a-log while others ate chocolate chirp cookies and drank a banana bug smoothie. Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 virus, the 2021 Buggey Buffet event has been canceled. We are hoping to host another Buggy Buffet soon!  

Dr. Grant, Matthew Longmire, and Kassie Hollabaugh at the Tennessee Valley Fair educating the youth on entomology

EPP Attends the Tennessee Valley Fair

Matthew Longmire and Kassie Hollabaugh, two graduate students, and one faculty member, Dr. Jerome Grant, have recently attended Down on the Farm at the Tennessee Valley Fair in Knoxville. They shared entomology with the kids in attendance. This annual outdoor event, sponsored by University of Tennessee Extension, is a special day dedicated to providing education and information about agriculture, farm safety, and more to young students. About 200 students attended this year’s event, which was modified slightly from previous events due to Covid-19. Bugs Rule!

The EPP Graduate Student Association Plans to Visit the Knoxville Farmers’ Market

Would you like to learn more about pest management and other information that relates to the growth of your crops? On Saturday, September 18th, the EPP Graduate Student Association (GSA) will be attending Market Square Knoxville to improve grower awareness and use of research-based information in pest management. To learn more, please stop by their tent between 9 AM EDT – 12 PM EDT. Flyers, informational packets, and EPP swag will be available.

A photo of Manuel Lluberas in front of the African Queen

This Was Not in the Job Description: Three Decades of Bouncing Around the Tropics Chasing Mosquitoes

EPP has invited Manuel Lluberas, a public health entomologist, to speak about his extensive experience in the control of insects of public health and veterinary importance obtained during the past three decades on September 16th at 1:00 PM EDT. He served twelve years as medical entomologist and medical intelligence officer for the US Navy attached to the US Marines and have been Executive Director for Public Health for H. D. Hudson Manufacturing Company over twenty-six (26) years. Manuel has provided technical assistance on the design, implementation, evaluation, and technical capacity building on integrated vector management to private and public entities and UN agencies in sixty-three (63) countries in three (3) continents. Some of his most significant accomplishments include designing the

Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration and Events

September 15 – October 15 is Hispanic Heritage Month. Hispanic Heritage Month celebrates the history and culture of Hispanic and Latino Americans and their ancestors who came from the Caribbean, Central and South America, Spain, and Mexico. The achievements of the American Latino community are celebrated nationwide through festivals, community gatherings, and more. The University of Tennessee will be holding events for students and the public throughout the month and these events can be found here. On September 23rd, 2021, Dr. Jurat-Fuentes, an EPP professor, will discuss the history of Argentine tango music and dance. This event is free and open to the public.

NPW ’21 — UTIA

National Pollinator Week is coming to a close, but it’s important to remember the importance of this event. While small and often inconspicuous, pollinators provide a wonderful service to our environment, economy, and culture. Even if it’s just one week of admiration for these critters, it’s imperative we consider pollinators and appreciate all they do for us as much as we can. Above, you can see a collage created by Dr. Jennifer Tsuruda. Below, you can see Governor Bill Lee’s 2021 proclamation. From here at UT, here are quotes from the Dean of Extension and the Vice President/Chancellor of UTIA:   “National pollinator week is a great time to reflect upon how important pollinators are across our ecosystems. Without them,

NPW ’21 — Pollinator Diversity

      There is great diversity in pollinators in the world but here in the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, we have a special place in our hearts for insect pollinators. For several crops (such as sunflowers, blueberries, sweet cherries, and apples), increased bee diversity can result in increased pollination and productivity. Similarly, diversity in floral resources helps supply essential nutrients to pollinators. The UT Gardens in Knoxville will soon be adding signage to indicate some of the pollinators’ favorite plants – please plan a visit to enjoy the plants and the pollinators!

NPW ’21 — Hoverflies

  Hoverflies are incredibly important pollinators. In many ways, they are the underdogs (underflies?) in the pollinating world as many mistake them for bees. They are experts of Batesian mimicry, acting as doppelgangers for wasps and bees in hopes of avoiding predators. Sometimes this mimicry is too uncanny, giving bees undue credit for the wonderful services these little critters provide. It’s quite easy to get the two confused, but as soon as the hoverfly takes flight and begins to “hover” in your face, you know you have the real deal. In addition to pollination, hoverflies also aid in pest management. Many of their larvae are predatory, eating other harmful pests that can damage our crops. They also recycle organic matter

NPW ’21 — Bees of Tennessee

Dr. Laura Russo from the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology created this wonderful poster showcasing many of the types of bees found here in Tennessee. Many are very common and can be found even in your own garden! From left to right/top to bottom: Mason bees Leaf cutter bees Small carpenter bees Bumble bees Sweat bees Mining bees Blue-green sweat bees   Let us know if you happen to find any of these bees in your own yard! Take plenty of pictures! Most of these critters are quite friendly and are reluctant to sting you so don’t be afraid. 🙂