Study Reveals High Genetic Diversity, Mutation, and Migration Rates of Bradford Pear

  Pyrus calleryana Decne. (Callery pear) is a deciduous tree native to China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. It is a popular ornamental tree in the United States (US) with early spring blooms and vibrant fall color. There are at least 26 cultivars of P. calleryana available in the US of which “Bradford” is the most well-known. Open-pollinated P. calleryana escapees are becoming one of the most common invasive tree species in the eastern United States. Developing better management practices for invasive P. calleryana requires detailed knowledge about reproductive biology and genetic diversity of the species, however, little is currently known about genetic variability within those open-pollinated populations. We investigated genetic diversity and population structure of non-cultivated, escaped P. calleryana populations

Portrait of Katy Smith

Recent Article: Costs of Horn Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Control for Cow-calf Producers in Tennessee and Texas, 2016

Ph.D. student Katy Smith and Associate Professor Dr. Trout Fryxell collaborated with the Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics and recently published an article titled “Costs of Horn Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Control for Cow-calf Producers in Tennessee and Texas, 2016” in the Journal of Economic Entomology. Horn flies (Haematobia irritans (L.)) are a common pests of livestock as they feed on the blood of their host 20 to 40 times per day. This article details the economic impact of managing this pest in both Southern states. To read the full article and find out more please visit here.  

Dr. Hadziabdic Guerry and Dr. Trigiano Lab Published in The American Phytopathological Society

Sarah Boggess, Dr. Denita Hadziabdic, Dr. Robert Trigiano, and colleagues published an article this past November in The American Phytopathological Society (APS) journal. The article titled “Conventional Gel Electrophoresis and TaqMan Probes Enable Rapid Confirmation of Thousand Cankers Disease From Diagnostic Samples“, discusses thousand cankers disease (TCD) and improved and rapid detection protocols.  For the full article, click here.

Portrait of Matthew Huff

Matt Huff’s Publication – High Quality Reference Genome for Fraxinus pennsylvanica

Recently, research associate, Matthew Huff, published an article titled “A high quality reference genome for Fraxinus pennsylvanica for ash species restoration and research”. The Fraxinus pennsylvanica, green ash tree, is distributed across North America, and due to a small percentage of these native trees remaining healthy, they are known as the “lingering ash”. To read the full article and find out more on the research being conducted on Fraxinus pennsylvanica, visit here.

Portrait Wanwan Liang

Accomplishments From a Recent Graduate, Dr. Wanwan Liang

  Dr. Wanwan Liang (class of 2019 and former EPP graduate student in the laboratory of Dr. Jerome Grant) recently published her fourth manuscript from her doctoral research conducted at the University of Tennessee. Her manuscripts were published in four prestigious journals: Biological Invasions, Ecological Modeling, Environmental Entomology, and Remote Sensing. She is currently a Post-Doctoral Associate in the Center of Geospatial Analytics at North Carolina State University and can be contacted at wliang5@ncsu.edu. Dr. Liang was an amazing student during her time here at UT. She excelled academically and socially; she fit right at home here in our department. She even stopped by to help with last year’s Buggy Buffet! We are very proud of her. If you get

New Paper on Relative Attractiveness of Ornamental Cultivars to Pollinators

Ornamental plants are generally considered to be less attractive to pollinating insects, but some varieties and cultivars are more attractive than others. Here we compare the relative attractiveness of different popular ornamental plants to flower-visiting insects and provide recommendations for more pollinator-friendly varieties. View the open-access article Please feel free to email Dr. Laura Russo with any questions concerning this project: lrusso@utk.edu