Close-up of an emerald-green native bee digging into a purple flower for pollen and nectar

Dr. Russo Awarded Early Career Robert May Prize from British Ecological Society

The Methods in Ecology and Evolution (MEE) Robert May early career researcher award is named after Lord May, from the University of Oxford. The prize is awarded annually to the best paper submitted by an early career author at the start of their research career. The winning paper: Laura Russo, Adam D. Miller, John Tooker et al. Quantitative evolutionary patterns in bipartite networks: Vicariance, phylogenetic tracking or diffuse co-evolution? Methods Ecol Evol 2018, 9:3. DOI: 10.1111/2041-210X.12914   Here is excerpt from BSE: Dr. Laura Russo led work to develop a framework that can incorporate species traits or behaviours to investigate diffuse evolutionary patterns within ecological communities, using plant-pollinator interactions as a case study. The study of interactions and their impacts

Brick walkways, flower archways, and various roses makes up the beautiful, ornamental garden for the Biltmore Estate

Dr. Mark Windham Selected for Rose Jury Position at Biltmore Estate

Since 2011, Biltmore Estate has run international rose trials where rose breeders and growers submit new roses for a two-year trial. Winning roses from the trials are considered to be some of the best roses in the world. Dr. Mark Windham has been invited to become a permanent judge for the International Jury for the Biltmore International Rose Trials competition. Additionally, he has been selected to participate in the annual formal international judging, which is attended by rose enthusiasts from across the globe. These invitations are a very big honor in the “rose world.” Dr. Windham was not chosen for his ability to grow roses (very modest skills at best), but for his ongoing research on rose diseases and for

Remembering Dr. Carroll Southards

The Entomology and Plant Pathology Department was saddened by the news of the passing of Dr. Carroll J. Southards on January 2, 2019. Dr. Southards joined the department (previously called Ag Biology) in 1965 as an assistant professor in Nematology. In 1974, Dr. Southards became head of the department of Ag Biology and under his leadership, the departmental name was changed to the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology. During Dr. Southards 20+ year tenure as department head, the department grew and flourished. Among his achievements were increasing diversity within the department and the development of departmental programs that assisted the citizenry of Tennessee. He also served as counselor to the President of the UT System from 1979-1981. Faculty, staff

The Cookeville Rose Society and Cumberland County Master Gardeners prepare for their tour to see how the resistance trials are going

Drs. Alan and Mark Windham Lead Rose Tour at the Plateau Research and Education Center

The Cookeville Rose Society and Cumberland County Master Gardeners took a twilight tour with Drs. Alan and Mark Windham through the rose rosette resistant trials at the Plateau Research and Education Center near Crossville, TN. While in the plots, they learned about how to recognize rose rosette, rose rosette management strategies, and research results concerning disease resistance. After the tour, everyone ate homemade ice cream while learning more about growing roses and how to control rose diseases and insect pests.

David checks behind a cows ears for ticks

Tennessee Tick Survey by Dr. Trout Fryxell and David Theuret

A tick survey study in Tennessee by Dr. Trout Fryxell and graduate student David Theuret highlighted in Entomology Today. The study revealed that one in six cattle and at livestock monitoring locations in all regions of the Tennessee have ticks. For more details, please see summary article Tick Surveillance Project Offers Model for Monitoring Livestock. The original article can be found here.

Fall armyworm voraciously feeding on plant tissue

Development of Novel DNA-Based Methods for Detection of Bt Resistant Fall Armyworms

During the past 22 years, pest control efficacy and the potential for higher net returns have driven a global increase in the adoption of transgenic crops which produce insecticidal proteins (Cry and Vip toxins) from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt crops). In the US alone, Bt corn and cotton adoption represent >80% of the national acreage devoted to the two commodities, which has unfortunately led to increasing selection pressure for evolution of Bt toxin resistant insect pests. One such devastating pest is the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) which has become a growing threat to the use of transgenic corn technology in the Western Hemisphere and more recently the African continent. The fall armyworm is the insect pest with the highest

Congratulations to Dr. Denita Hadziabdic Guerry – Fulbright Scholar!

Several indigenous crop species have the potential to become foods of the future and need to be integrated into existing agricultural research. Dr. Denita Hadziabdic Guerry was selected for a Fulbright award to the African Regional Research Program to study an indigenous crop, frafra potato (Solenostemon rotendifolius), as an alternative food source. She will spend four months in Ghana working closely with her collaborator at the University of Ghana (UG), Dr. Naalamle Amissah, to evaluate genetic diversity of frafra potato populations in Ghana and surrounding sub-Saharan African countries where this species is cultivated. This is quite an innovative project that involves studying traditional subjects while providing hands-on experiential learning experiences for faculty, staff, and students at the University of Ghana. Congratulations, Dr. Guerry!

EUReCA! winners from left to right: Angel Chaffin (top), Logan Houston (bottom), and Geordan Hall

EUReCA! Winners

Logan Houston, an undergraduate researchers in the Trigiano lab, was awarded a Gold Medal at last night’s EUReCA awards ceremony. Logan’s award was one of four in the STEM section of the competition. Logan’s research, “Geographical location drives the population structure of native Asian Cornus florida” was supported by the Trigiano lab and guided primarily by Dr. Marcin Nowicki. Angel Chaffin, one of our EPP minors, was awarded an Honorable Mention for her work on, “Potential pathogens of industrial hemp (Cannibas sativa)”. Although her research was sponsored by Dr. Kimberly Gwinn, she was also assisted by Cody Seals, Mary Dee, Dr. Ernest Bernard, and Dr. Jerome Grant. Geordan Hall, who worked with Drs. Karen Vail and Becky Trout Fryxell, also