finger pointing to honey bees on a frame

Tsuruda Attends the 2022 Organic Farming and Gardening Field Day

  On April 28th, the 2022 Organic Farming and Gardening Field Day event was held at the East Tennessee AgResearch and Education Center (ETREC) Organic Crops Unit. UT faculty and staff, as well as other experienced personnel, gave presentations to the public on a variety of topics, ranging from alley cropping agroforestry for vegetable production to creating pollinator habitats in gardens. EPP Assistant Professor and Extension Apiculture Specialist Dr. Jennifer Tsuruda, one of the featured speakers at the event, engaged the participants with her pollinator jokes while informing them about science-based information to help create pollinator habits in their home gardens and farms. The importance of site preparation and the need for research on the nutritional value of different plant

A honey bee on the MBP apiary sign

Registration is Now Open For The 2022 TN Master Beekeeping Program Classes

Registration is now open for the 2022 TN Master Beekeeping Program classes! Whether you are thinking about becoming a beekeeper or have been keeping bees for years, there is always new research-based information to learn. Please join us and help the bees by increasing your education to improve your beekeeping operation and decrease your losses. More information can be found here: https://epp.tennessee.edu/masterbee/. Due to the level of interest, please be patient when trying to register.

a photo of two pieces of Dr. Alan Windham's ornamental disease collection on display

Dr. Alan Windham’s End of the Road World Tour

    For many years, Dr. Alan Windham has provided leadership for educational programs in diseases affecting ornamental plants. Recently, Windham traveled to Knoxville to display his extensive ornamental disease collection to students enrolled in EPP 410, Diseases and Insects of Ornamental Plants. Other students, staff, and faculty that were interested in viewing his collection were also invited. His colleague, Dr. Mark Windham, stated that the “collection is without peer in North America, perhaps the word”. As this was the last time he would be setting up his display for the class, students were appreciative of the opportunity to view such a huge collection.

A honey bee on the MBP apiary sign

Successful 2021 Tennessee Master Beekeeping Students Receive Apiary Sign

After several delays and supply issues (thank you for your patience!), the Master Beekeeping Program has sent out the first-ever MBP apiary signs to participants who successfully completed the 2021 class. If you earned your certificate, keep your eyes peeled. Those who did not earn a certificate were sent a copy of Beekeeping in TN and should keep their eyes peeled, too! Please note we are planning in-person classes for 2022 and are working with county Extension personnel to coordinate dates and locations. Until then, please hang tight and fill out the Interest Form on our website (tiny.utk.edu/apiculture) so we will know where there is interest and who to contact once the schedule is finalized. Do not be confused by

Portrait of Laurie Barley

Laurie Barley Awarded the UTIA Extension “Award of Excellence”

Laurie Barley has been awarded the prestigious UTIA Extension non-exempt “Award of Excellence” that goes to an outstanding non-exempt employee who has gone “beyond the call of duty.” Laurie was instrumental in contributing to, and continuing, the educational and testing program of our state-wide Pesticide Safety and Education Program (PSEP) during the last 18 months. During this time, testing and recertification continued even as Covid-19 threatened to close them. This award recognizes her contributions to the attainment of the objectives of Extension:  including leadership, initiative, reliability, cooperativeness, personality, professionalism, communications, competence, planning and implementation. Please join us in CONGRATULATING Laurie on this outstanding recognition!

Fall Armyworm

Scientists Discuss the Fall Armyworm Invasion

In The Conversation, entomology professor, Dr. Scott Stewart, discusses the invasive species, fall armyworms and control measures. The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is an annual problem and has been invading lawns and fields across the United States. These species destroy lawns by feeding and chewing holes in leaves. To the eyes of many, these fall armyworms come across as worms. However, the fall army worm is a striped caterpillar. In the Summer, the entire lifecycle of the worm is about 30 days and twice the amount of days in the Fall and Spring. To read the full article, please click here.

NPW ’21 — UTIA

National Pollinator Week is coming to a close, but it’s important to remember the importance of this event. While small and often inconspicuous, pollinators provide a wonderful service to our environment, economy, and culture. Even if it’s just one week of admiration for these critters, it’s imperative we consider pollinators and appreciate all they do for us as much as we can. Above, you can see a collage created by Dr. Jennifer Tsuruda. Below, you can see Governor Bill Lee’s 2021 proclamation. From here at UT, here are quotes from the Dean of Extension and the Vice President/Chancellor of UTIA:   “National pollinator week is a great time to reflect upon how important pollinators are across our ecosystems. Without them,

The adult female ambrosia beetle and ambrosial fungi in the gallery

Granulate Ambrosia Beetles

Dr. Jason Oliver at the TSU Otis Floyd Nursery Research Center in McMinnville alerted us that they had caught a single granulate ambrosia beetle adult and two black stem borers in their ethyl alcohol baited trap when it was checked on Wednesday, March 18. As spring approaches, so too do the emergence of these pests as temperatures at or above 70 degrees F are conducive for ambrosia beetle activity. They primarily attack trees that are stressed and dormant, which many plants, especially if they were not irrigated last August through October could have been damaged by the flash drought. Often, these plants will not show signs of stress because of their dormancy. The granulate ambrosia beetle is an invasive pest from